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    "'Henrietta Swan Leavitt,' or 'This is not Edwin Hubble's Pipe'"

    Original for SaleSave Favorites
    Price: 8,000.00 USD
    Contact rebeccalynndashpainting@gmail.com
    www.rebeccalynndashpainting.com
    Added 2019-03-30 08:08:04
    Created by

    Description

    This historical portrait depicts Henrietta Swan Leavitt, who worked at the Harvard Observatory in the late 19th and early 20th centuries, and discovered that a star’s luminosity directly correlates to the speed at which it pulses (pulsating stars are known as cepheid variable stars).  Therefore, stars that twinkle at similar rates as others but appear fainter, are in fact much further away. This theory would change our knowledge of the scope and size of the universe, thought at the time to be about the size of the Milky Way Galaxy.

    The pages beneath her elbow hold photographs of the Magellanic Clouds, where Ms. Leavitt measured and offered her theory about the relationship to cepheid variable stars' luminosity and their pulses. The telescope is a likeness of the body of the 100 inch Hooker Telescope. Being a woman at the turn-of-the-century, Henrietta was not allowed near the telescopes, and history credits Edwin Hubble to her discovery, as he used this telescope to verify her theory by measuring stars in the Andromeda Galaxy (at which the telescope points).  The pipe beneath the the telescope represents Hubble, as he was rarely seen without one, to accompany his phony British accent.  The title has a tongue-in-cheek reference to how Hubble gained fame by making the discovery through a woman's work and theory, and also is an homage to Rene Magritte, a favorite painter of mine.

    Specific details

    Name of Artist: Rebecca Lynn Dash
    Width (inches): 24
    Height (inches): 30
    Media: Oil, Other
    Country: United States
    Painting Genre: Representational: Figurative / Other
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